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Article
December 1917

A REPORT ON FORTY CASES OF ACUTE ARTHRITIS TREATED BY THE INTRAVENOUS INJECTION OF FOREIGN PROTEIN

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Second Medical Service of Bellevue Hospital, Cornell Medical School.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1917;XX(6):951-963. doi:10.1001/archinte.1917.00090060125011
Abstract

Nonspecific vaccination in the treatment of infections is not a new procedure. As far back as 1893, Rumpf1 treated typhoid fever patients with a B. pyocyaneus vaccine and claimed to have obtained excellent results. Von Wagner2 found that paretics treated with tuberculin showed marked improvement. Hiss and Zinsser3 used extracts of rabbit's leukocytes in various infectious diseases, especially pneumonia, and were favorably impressed with the results. Some of the German writers have employed boiled milk subcutaneously in infections, and report success. More recently Schaefer's mixture of many bacteria has been widely advertised in the treatment of various diseases, more particularly of arthritis. The practice of intravenous injection of foreign proteins is a comparatively recent one, and may be said to have originated with the intravenous injection of typhoid vaccine in the treatment of typhoid fever. Ichikawa4 was one of the first to use the intravenous method of vaccination. By giving

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