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Article
January 1918

THE EFFECT OF VARIOUS NEUTRAL SOLUTIONS ON GASTRIC DISCHARGE, GASTRIC SECRETION AND DUODENAL REGURGITATION

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Laboratory of Physiology of the Northwestern University Medical School.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1918;XXI(1):48-58. doi:10.1001/archinte.1918.00090070057004
Abstract

In a recent publication1 attention was called to various conflicting experimental and clinical observations concerning the relation of acidity of gastric contents to the rate of gastric discharge. In general, physiologic literature supports the theory that an acid reaction is essential to and hastens gastric discharge up to an optimum acidity of from 0.15 to 0.25 per cent. Some clinical observers find that so-called hyperacidity increases gastric motility, while others consider it a contributing factor in stasis and gastric dilatation. Motility is often unimpaired in cases of achylia gastrica. Our investigations showed: (1) that water is discharged from the fasting stomach of anesthetized pithed dogs more rapidly than any percentage of acid; (2) the rate of discharge is decreased with increase of acidity; (3) duodenal regurgitation as evidenced by increase in the contents of the stomach often occurred at 0.2 per cent. acidity, and in nearly all trials occurred at

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