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Article
January 1918

THE RATE OF ABSORPTION AND EXCRETION OF THE IODIDS OF STRONTIUM, SODIUM AND POTASSIUM

Author Affiliations

OMAHA; CLEVELAND

From the Pharmacological Laboratory, School of Medicine, University of Nebraska.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1918;XXI(1):176-180. doi:10.1001/archinte.1918.00090070187015
Abstract

Strontium salts have been used to a limited extent in therapeutics for the effect of the bromid, iodid or salicylate radical, but their use has been more or less discouraged because it was thought that the strontium salts were more slowly absorbed than the corresponding salts of sodium and potassium.1

Since all iodids would exist in the blood and tissues essentially as sodium iodid, the excretion would be the same irrespective of the cathion, provided, of course, that the other conditions were the same. Consequently, any difference in the excretion of the iodid in the urine would indicate that the change was primarily in the absorption of the original iodid. Iodid was chosen in this investigation because its normal excretion has often been determined and because its quantitative estimation is simple and accurate. The excretion of strontium iodid was compared with that of sodium and potassium.

Method.—The investigation was made

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