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Article
February 1918

THE MAINTENANCE DIET IN DIABETES MELLITUS AS DETERMINED BY THE NITROGEN EQUILIBRIUM

Author Affiliations

From the Medical Clinic of the Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1918;XXI(2):269-281. doi:10.1001/archinte.1918.00090080096009
Abstract

In the treatment of diabetes mellitus there are two guiding principles which determine the caloric value of the diet. In the first place, the quantity of carbohydrates, proteins and fats offered the patient must be within his carbohydrate tolerance; that is, the diet must be so regulated that the urine remains sugar-free. It is generally acknowledged that under these circumstances the disease itself is treated in the most effective manner. Secondly, a diet of sufficient caloric value should be offered the patient so that his health and strength may be maintained at a normal level. It is readily appreciated that these two guiding principles of treatment are diametrically opposed to each other in many respects. The one demands a restricted diet, and in many instances, undernutrition; the other calls for a larger amount of food. The first aims at treating the disease, diabetes mellitus; the second attempts to conserve the

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