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Article
March 1918

THE EFFECT OF DIURETICS ON THE GENERAL BLOOD PRESSURE IN ANIMALS WITH CONSTRICTION OF THE RENAL ARTERIES

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE; OKAYAMA, JAPAN

From the Hunterian Laboratory of the Department of Medicine of the Johns Hopkins University.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1918;XXI(3):351-353. doi:10.1001/archinte.1918.00020010043004
Abstract

Since the days of Traube1 a mechanical explanation for the high blood pressure of chronic renal disease has frequently been advocated, the original theory postulating increased peripheral resistance in the kidney itself as the cause. Failure of ligature of both renal arteries to raise the blood pressure materially was sufficient disproof of the theory in any such simple form. Various modifications of it have been suggested. Katzenstein2 obtained a slight rise after incomplete occlusion of the renal arteries, and Alwens3 by compressing the kidneys in oncometers. In spite of the failure to produce any rise in blood pressure at all comparable to the hypertension of human nephritis, the obvious association of hypertension with those types of renal disease in which the renal arterial system is most compromised, in the absence of any other satisfactory explanation, has prevented the entire abandonment of the mechanical theory. Furthermore, clinicians have

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