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Article
March 1918

INFLUENCES OF EXTRARENAL FACTORS ON THE RENAL FUNCTIONAL TEST MEAL

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Harriman Research Laboratory and the Pathologic Laboratory of the Roosevelt Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1918;XXI(3):366-380. doi:10.1001/archinte.1918.00020010058006
Abstract

FACTORS INFLUENCING TEST MEALS  Seeking to investigate renal function in both healthy and diseased kidneys in terms of their response to their most accustomed stimulation, Hedinger and Schlayer1 studied their reaction to a twenty-four-hour standard diet. Mosenthal,2 continuing this method, revised their procedure and made it somewhat more adaptable to private practice and nonhospital patients. His dietary contained about 13.4 gm. of nitrogen, 8.5 gm. of salt, and 1,760 c.c. of fluid, including a fair quantity of diuretic materials in the form of purins. The twenty-four-hour diet was given in three meals: at 8 a. m., 12 m. and 5 p. m. The urine was collected at two hour intervals from 8 a. m., to 8 p. m., and a night specimen from 8 p. m. to 8 a. m. of the following day; but no three day fixed diet was demanded preceding the last day, as was

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