[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.211.62.139. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
July 1918

STUDIES ON RENAL FUNCTION DURING AND IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING SOME OF THE ACUTE INFECTIOUS DISEASES

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Department of Medicine, Harvard University, and the Medical Clinic, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1918;XXII(1):74-81. doi:10.1001/archinte.1918.00090120079007
Abstract

It is well known that definite anatomic lesions may occur in the kidney during the course of almost any of the acute infectious diseases. These lesions are usually, if not always, associated with clinical signs such as edema, scanty urine, the appearance of albumin in the urine, or abnormal findings in the sediment. The renal function as studied by various special tests is much impaired in these cases, as has been shown by Schwartz and McGill.1 Naturally such acute lesions in the kidney often result in permanent anatomic injury to the kidney, with or without disturbance in renal function.

In other cases during acute infections it is not uncommon to find albumin and casts in the urine without any other clinical evidence of renal disturbance. Also, during the course of an acute infection, there may be a decrease of substances normally found in the urine, such as the low chlorid

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×