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Article
September 1918

PATHOLOGIC REPORT ON FORTY-THREE CASES OF ACUTE POLIOMYELITIS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Bureau of Laboratories, Department of Health.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1918;XXII(3):312-330. doi:10.1001/archinte.1918.00090140045004
Abstract

The morbid anatomy of acute poliomyelitis has received careful and painstaking study by a number of European pathologists. Rissler1 was the first to describe the anatomic changes in the central nervous system, with a report of three cases, in 1888. The changes described were confirmed by a number of other students of the disease, chief among whom are Wickman2 with a report of fourteen cases, Harbitz and Scheel3 with nineteen cases, and Strauss4 with eight cases.

These anatomic studies are confined chiefly to the nervous elements of the body, comparatively little attention having been paid to the other organs. Flexner, Peabody and Draper5 studied eleven acute cases with special reference to the changes in the organs other than the central nervous system. They found constant changes in the lymphatic structures throughout the body and called attention to focal degenerative lesions in the liver. The changes in the lymphatic tissues consisted

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