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Article
September 1918

A STUDY OF EIGHT CASES OF ACUTE NEPHRITIS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Medical Clinic, Presbyterian Hospital, and the Coolidge Fellowship in Medicine, Columbia University.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1918;XXII(3):370-408. doi:10.1001/archinte.1918.00090140103007
Abstract

INTRODUCTION  A strictly pathologic interpretation of the term acute nephritis must mean acute inflammation of the kidneys, an inflammation primary or superimposed on a chronic process. There are, however, certain acute clinical pictures in which edema, albuminuria and other so-called renal findings may occur independent of real inflammatory disease. Hence a more consistent name for this group would be acute renal syndrome, and the cases presented here are so considered, although in certain of them actual inflammation was probably present. Moreover, in some of the cases one feels that possibly the renal manifestations are entirely secondary to a systemic disease, as is the chlorid retention of pneumonia. Two cases (7 and 8) are definitely chronic (from their histories), but they differ so strikingly from each other and are so similar in many ways to the truly acute cases that they are included for purposes of comparison. The "acuteness" of the

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