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Article
December 1918

CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PHYSIOLOGY OF THE STOMACHXLIX. HUNGER AND APPETITE IN PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS

Author Affiliations

Resident Physician, Cook County Hospital CHICAGO

From the Tuberculosis Hospital of Cook County Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1918;XXII(6):759-765. doi:10.1001/archinte.1918.00090170069004
Abstract

Recent studies by Carlson1 and his co-workers emphasize the importance and the relative simplicity of an accurate study of hunger in normal and pathologic conditions. Cannon and Carlson have shown that the sensations of hunger are due to regular periodic contractions of the stomach. Deviations from the normal hunger sensations are associated with changes in the character of the hunger contractions and stomach tonus. This has been demonstrated in man and animals in many conditions such as gastric ulcer, gastric carcinoma, diabetes and gastritis. Meyer and Carlson2 studied the condition of hunger and appetite in fever and found that the hunger contractions are absent in temporary fevers when the temperature reaches 103 F. and over, and that the dogs will not eat when febrile.

USUAL SYMPTOMS  Loss of appetite and absence of hunger are well recognized clinical manifestations of early and advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. The close relationship between the temperature

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