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Table 1. 
Reported Cases of Dental Surgery on Patients Receiving Continuous Oral Anticoagulant Therapy*
Reported Cases of Dental Surgery on Patients Receiving Continuous Oral Anticoagulant Therapy*
Table 2. 
Reported Cases of Withdrawal of Continuous Oral Anticoagulation for Dental Procedures*
Reported Cases of Withdrawal of Continuous Oral Anticoagulation for Dental Procedures*
1.
Herman  WWKonzelman  JLSutley  SH Current perspectives on dental patients receiving coumarin anticoagulant therapy. J Am Dent Assoc. 1997;128327- 335Article
2.
Bierne  ORKoehler  JR Surgical management of patients on warfarin sodium. J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 1996;541115- 1118Article
3.
Weibert  RT Oral anticoagulant therapy in patients undergoing dental surgery. Clin Pharm. 1992;11857- 864
4.
Butchart  EG Anticoagulation management during non-cardiac surgery: time for common sense. J Heart Valve Dis. 1994;3313- 314
5.
Benoliel  RLeviner  EKatz  JTzukert  A Dental treatment for the patient on anticoagulant therapy: prothrombin time value—what difference does it make? Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol. 1986;62149- 151Article
6.
Askey  JMCherry  CB Dental extraction during dicumarol therapy. Calif Med. 1956;8416- 17
7.
Pavek  VBigl  P Stomatological treatment of patients with artificial heart valves: coagulation control and antibiotic cover. Int Dent J. 1993;4359- 61
8.
Patton  LLShip  JA Treatment of patients with bleeding disorders. Dent Clin North Am. 1994;38465- 482
9.
Carr  MMMason  RB Dental management of anticoagulated patients. Can Dent Assoc J. 1992;58838- 844
10.
Roser  SMRosenbloom  B Continued anticoagulation in oral surgery procedures. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol. 1975;40448- 457Article
11.
Mulligan  RWeitzel  KG Pretreatment management of the patient receiving anticoagulant drugs. J Am Dent Assoc. 1988;117479- 483
12.
Wahl  MJHowell  J Altering anticoagulation therapy: a survey of physicians. J Am Dent Assoc. 1996;127625- 638Article
13.
Hirsh  JDalen  JEDeykin  DPoller  L Oral anticoagulants: mechanism of action, clinical effectiveness, and optimal therapeutic range. Chest. 1992;102(suppl)312S- 326SArticle
14.
Hirsh  JFuster  V Guide to anticoagulant therapy, part 2: oral anticoagulants. Circulation. 1994;891469- 1480Article
15.
Cannegieter  SCRosendaal  FRWintzen  AR  et al.  Optimal oral anticoagulant therapy in patients with mechanical heart valves. N Engl J Med. 1995;33311- 17Article
16.
Le  DTWeibert  RTSevilla  BKDonnelly  KJRapaport  SI The international normalized ratio (INR) for monitoring warfarin therapy: reliability and relation to other monitoring methods. Ann Intern Med. 1994;120552- 558Article
17.
Hirsh  JDeykin  DPoller  L "Therapeutic range" for oral anticoagulant therapy. Chest. 1986;89(suppl)11S- 15SArticle
18.
Hirsch  JPoller  L The international normalized ratio: a guide to understanding and correcting its problems. Arch Intern Med. 1994;154282- 288Article
19.
Anavi  YSharon  AGutman  DLaufer  D Dental extractions during anticoagulant therapy. Isr J Dent Med. 1981;28 ((4)) 9- 12
20.
Bailey  BMWFordyce  AM Complications of dental extractions in patients receiving warfarin anticoagulant therapy: a controlled clinical trial. Br Dent J. 1983;155308- 310Article
21.
Bandrowsky  TVorono  AABorris  TJMarcantoni  HW Amoxicillin-related postextraction bleeding in an anticoagulated patient with tranexamic acid rinses. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod. 1996;82610- 612Article
22.
Behrman  SJWright  IS Dental surgery during continuous anticoagulant therapy. J Am Dent Assoc. 1961;62172- 180
23.
Borea  GMontebugnoli  LCapuzzi  PMagelli  C Tranexamic acid as a mouthwash in anticoagulant-treated patients undergoing oral surgery: an alternative method to discontinuing anticoagulant therapy. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol. 1993;7529- 31Article
24.
Cone  A Dental abscess in an anticoagulated patient with ankylosing spondylitis. Br J Hosp Med. 1993;49190
25.
Frank  BWDickhaus  DWClaus  EC Dental extractions in the presence of continual anticoagulant therapy. Ann Intern Med. 1963;59911- 913Article
26.
Greenberg  MSMiller  MFLynch  MA Partial thromboplastin time as a predictor of blood loss in oral surgery patients receiving coumarin anticoagulants. J Am Dent Assoc. 1972;84583- 587
27.
Kovacs  BToth  KKerenyi  G Post-extraction hemostasis during coumarin anticoagulant therapy with a locally applied coagulation-active substance. Int J Oral Surg. 1976;53- 7Article
28.
Kwapis  BW Anticoagulant therapy and dental practice. J Am Dent Assoc. 1963;66172- 175
29.
Martinowitz  UMazar  ALTaicher  S  et al.  Dental extraction for patients on oral anticoagulant therapy. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol. 1990;70274- 277Article
30.
McIntyre  H Management, during dental surgery, of patients on anticoagulants. Lancet. 1966;299- 100Article
31.
Ramstrom  GSindet-Pedersen  SHall  GBlomback  MAlander  U Prevention of postsurgical bleeding in oral surgery using tranexamic acid without dose modification of oral anticoagulants. J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 1993;511211- 1216Article
32.
Shira  RBHall  RJGuernsey  LH Minor oral surgery during prolonged anticoagulant therapy. J Oral Surg. 1962;2093- 99
33.
Souto  JCOliver  AZuazu-Jausoro  IVives  AFontcuberta  J Oral surgery in anticoagulated patients without reducing the dose of oral anticoagulant: a prospective randomized study. J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 1996;5427- 32Article
34.
Sindet-Pedersen  SRamstrom  GBernvil  SBlomback  M Hemostatic effect of tranexamic acid mouthwash in anticoagulant-treated patients undergoing oral surgery. N Engl J Med. 1989;320840- 843Article
35.
Street  AMLeung  W Use of tranexamic acid mouthwash in dental procedures in patients taking oral anticoagulants. Med J Aust. 1990;153630
36.
Tomasi  NJWolf  JE Presurgical management of a patient receiving anticoagulant therapy: report of case. J Am Dent Assoc. 1974;881028- 1029
37.
Tulloch  JWright  IS Long-term anticoagulant therapy: further experiences. Circulation. 1954;9823- 834Article
38.
Waldrep  ACMcKelvey  LE Oral surgery for patients on anticoagulant therapy. J Oral Surg. 1968;26374- 380Article
39.
Wood  GDDeeble  T Warfarin: dangers with antibiotics. Dent Update. 1993;20350- 353
40.
Yoshimura  YOka  MKishimoto  HMatsuura  RMishima  K Hemodynamic changes during dental extraction and post-extraction bleeding in patients with prosthetic heart valves. Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 1987;16425- 431Article
41.
Ziffer  AMScopp  IWBeck  JBaum  JBerger  AR Profound bleeding after dental extractions during dicumarol therapy. N Engl J Med. 1957;256351- 353Article
42.
Scopp  IWFredrics  H Dental extractions in patients undergoing anticoagulant therapy. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol. 1958;11470- 474Article
43.
Zusman  SPLustig  JPBaston  I Postextraction hemostasis in patients on anticoagulant therapy: the use of a fibrin sealant. Quintessence Int. 1992;23713- 716
44.
Dajani  ASTaubert  KAWilson  W  et al.  Prevention of bacterial endocarditis: recommendations by the American Heart Association. JAMA. 1997;2771794- 1801Article
45.
Not Available, Antimicrobial prophylaxis in surgery. Med Lett. 1995;3779- 82
46.
Not Available, Postoperative instructions. Peterson  LJEllis  EHupp  JRTucker  MReds.Contemporary Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 2nd ed. St Louis, Mo Mosby–Year Book Inc1993;772
47.
Eckman  MHBeshansky  JRDurand-Zaleski  ILevine  HJPauker  SG Anticoagulation for noncardiac procedures in patients with prosthetic heart valves: does low risk mean high cost? JAMA. 1990;2631513- 1521Article
48.
Tinker  JHTarhan  S Discontinuing anticoagulant therapy in surgical patients with cardiac valve prostheses: observations in 180 operations. JAMA. 1978;239738- 739Article
49.
Grip  LBlomback  MSchulman  S Hypercoagulable state and thromboembolism following warfarin withdrawal in post-myocardial infarction patients. Eur Heart J. 1991;121225- 1233Article
50.
Michaels  LBeamish  RE Relapses of thromboembolic disease after discontinued anticoagulant therapy: a comparison of the incidence after abrupt and after gradual termination of treatment. Am J Cardiol. 1967;20670- 673Article
51.
Cosgriff  SW Chronic anticoagulant therapy in recurrent embolism of cardiac origin. Ann Intern Med. 1953;38278- 287Article
52.
Akbarian  MAusten  WGYurchak  PMScannell  JG Thromboembolic complications of prosthetic cardiac valves. Circulation. 1968;37826- 831Article
53.
Davis  FBSczupak  CA Outpatient oral anticoagulation: guidelines for long-term management. Postgrad Med. 1979;66100- 109
54.
Marshall  J Rebound phenomena after anticoagulant therapy in cerebrovascular disease. Circulation. 1963;28329- 332Article
55.
Mulligan  R Response to anticoagulant drug withdrawal. J Am Dent Assoc. 1987;115435- 438
56.
Ogiuchi  HAndo  TTanaka  M  et al.  Clinical reports on dental extraction from patients undergoing oral anticoagulant therapy. Bull Tokyo Dent Coll. 1985;26205- 212
57.
Saour  JNAli  HAMammo  LARFSieck  JO Dental procedures in patients receiving oral anticoagulation therapy. J Heart Valve Dis. 1994;3315- 317
58.
Sheller  BTong  D Dental management of a child on anticoagulant therapy and the International Normalized Ratio: case report. Pediatr Dent. 1994;1656- 58
59.
Wood  JCConn  HL Prevention of systemic arterial embolism in chronic rheumatic heart disease by means of protracted anticoagulant therapy. Circulation. 1954;10517- 523Article
60.
Zusman  SPLustig  JPNun  GB Cost evaluation of two methods of post tooth extraction hemostasis in patients on anticoagulant therapy. Community Dent Health. 1993;10167- 173
61.
Rooney  TP General dentistry during continuous anticoagulation therapy. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol. 1983;56252- 255Article
62.
Catalano  PM Introduction to hemostasis. Rose  LFKaye  Deds.Internal Medicine for Dentistry 2nd ed. St Louis, Mo Mosby–Year Book Inc1990;346
63.
Peterson  LJ Prevention and management of surgical complications. Peterson  LJEllis  EHupp  JRTucker  MReds.Contemporary Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 2nd ed. St Louis, Mo Mosby– Year Book Inc1993;269- 288
64.
Not Available, Bleeding disorders. Sonis  STFazio  RCFang  LPrinciples and Practice of Oral Medicine 2nd ed. Philadelphia, Pa WB Saunders Co1995;242- 261
65.
Dugdale  MSmith  RM The patient with bleeding problems. Dent Clin North Am. 1983;27271- 288
66.
Not Available, Disorders of hemostasis. Accepted Dental Therapeutics 40th ed. Chicago, Ill American Dental Association1984;39- 40
67.
Little  JWFalace  DA Bleeding disorders. Dental Management of the Medically Compromised Patient 5th ed. St Louis, Mo Mosby–Year Book Inc1997;466- 494
68.
Cohen  SGGlick  M Anticoagulant therapy. Rose  LFKaye  Deds.Internal Medicine for Dentistry 2nd ed. St Louis, Mo Mosby–Year Book Inc1990;374
69.
Not Available, Physicians Insurers Association of America report: top ten reasons for malpractice suits. Wilmington, Del. Sunday News Journal. November22 1992;A15
Review Article
August 10/24, 1998

Dental Surgery in Anticoagulated Patients

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Dentistry, Christiana Care Health Services, Wilmington, Del.

Arch Intern Med. 1998;158(15):1610-1616. doi:10.1001/archinte.158.15.1610
Abstract

Continuous oral anticoagulant therapy has been used to decrease the risk of thromboembolism for more than half a century, prolonging the lives of thousands of patients. Many physicians recommend interrupting continuous anticoagulant therapy for dental surgery to prevent hemorrhage. In reviewing the available literature, there are no well-documented cases of serious bleeding problems from dental surgery in patients receiving therapeutic levels of continuous warfarin sodium therapy, but there were several documented cases of serious embolic complications in patients whose warfarin therapy was withdrawn for dental treatment. Many authorities state that dental extractions can be performed with minimal risk in patients who are at or above therapeutic levels of anticoagulation. There are sound legal reasons to continue therapeutic levels of warfarin for dental treatment. Although there is a theoretical risk of hemorrhage after dental surgery in patients who are at therapeutic levels of anticoagulation, the risk appears to be minimal, the bleeding usually can be easily treated with local measures, and this risk may be greatly outweighed by the risk of thromboembolism after withdrawal of anticoagulant therapy.

Continuous oral anticoagulant therapy has been used to decrease the risk of thromboembolism for more than 50 years, prolonging the lives of thousands of patients. Dental treatment on continuously anticoagulated patients has been controversial,14 and physicians must weigh the risks of hemorrhage from the dental procedure against the risks of emboli from withdrawing anticoagulation treatment. Some recommend no change in anticoagulation for dental treatment.5,6 Others recommend withdrawal of oral anticoagulant therapy for several days before the procedure and consideration of therapeutic administration of heparin for certain high-risk patients and high-risk dental procedures.711 The focus of this article is to review only surgical dental procedures (extractions, gingival surgery, and alveolar surgery): nonsurgical dental procedures (professional cleanings, fillings, crowns, etc) have been shown not to present a significant bleeding risk.5

In a 1995 survey, the majority (73%) of practicing physicians recommended withdrawing therapeutic continuous warfarin therapy in some patients for at least some dental procedures.12 Instead of changing the patient's prothrombin time, it is time to change the practice of withdrawing anticoagulant treatment for dental surgery.

DENTAL SURGERY IN ANTICOAGULANT-TREATED PATIENTS

In a review of the English-language literature (using computerized searches and authors' references), there have been more than 2014 dental surgical procedures (including more than 1964 dental extractions) documented in 26 case reports and studies of more than 774 patients receiving continuous oral anticoagulant therapy. These procedures include both single and multiple simple extractions, surgical extractions, full mouth extractions, alveoectomies, and other surgical procedures. Nonsurgical dental procedures were not included in this review. Many of the patients had levels of warfarin above 1992 recommended levels on the day of surgery. In 1992, the American College of Chest Physicians stated that the recommended therapeutic range of warfarin is an international normalized ratio (INR) of 2.0 to 3.0 for all conditions except for patients with mechanical prosthetic valves, for which the INR is 2.5 to 3.5.13 These recommendations were endorsed by the American Heart Association.14 Assuming an international sensitivity index between 1.8 and 2.8, the therapeutic prothrombin time (PT) ratio would range from at lowest 1.3 to at highest 2.0. Cannegieter et al15 have suggested a higher therapeutic range, an INR of 3.0 to 4.0 (PT ratio ≤2.2), for patients with artificial valves. Therefore, for the purposes of this review, the therapeutic level of warfarin in all patients is no higher than an INR of 4.0 or a PT ratio (at highest) of 2.2. The studies of reported cases of dental surgery on patients receiving continuous oral anticoagulant therapy are summarized in Table 1.

Because of variations in study designs and differences in measuring the intensity of anticoagulant therapy between the more recent and the older reports, these studies do not lend themselves to a conventional meta-analysis or even systematic review. Still, of the more than 2014 dental surgical procedures reported in more than 774 patients receiving continuous warfarin therapy, the following observations can be made:

  • Although some patients had minor oozing treated with local measures, more than 98% of patients receiving continuous anticoagulation had no serious bleeding problems after dental surgery, with serious bleeding problems defined as bleeding uncontrolled by local measures.

  • Many of these procedures were performed in patients with warfarin levels above present recommended therapeutic levels of anticoagulation.

  • Many procedures were extensive, including multiple and full mouth extractions, alveoectomies, and surgical extractions.

  • Only 12 patients (<2%) had postoperative bleeding problems that were controlled by more than local measures. But after examining these 12 cases closely, none makes a good case for withdrawal of warfarin for dental surgery.

ANALYSIS OF 12 DOCUMENTED CASES OF POSTOPERATIVE HEMORRHAGE TREATED BY MORE THAN LOCAL MEASURES

In 5 of the 12 cases,30,32,41 the PT ratios were above therapeutic levels. In 3 cases21,39 in which patients were administered concomitant antibiotics, the preoperative INR was within the therapeutic range, and bleeding was initially controlled in all 3 cases by local measures. After 2 consecutive days (contrary to American Heart Association guidelines to prevent endocarditis44) of high-dose prophylactic erythromycin treatment, 1 of these patients developed bleeding 2 days after the extraction (when his INR was 4.3).39 Another patient had 6 extractions done after prophylactic amoxicillin was administered.39 Interestingly, although this patient's INR was an astounding 9.1 one week after the extraction, only 1 socket was bleeding, and this bleeding was only described as "oozing," indicating that the hospitalization may have been precautionary for the high INR and not for the oozing. The authors speculated that the antibiotics caused the increase in INR and subsequent bleeding and oozing, although there may have been other causes, including warfarin overdose. In the third case, the patient had a therapeutic preoperative INR of 3.51 for 20 extractions and an alveoplasty, and there was good hemostasis 72 hours postoperatively.21 Although antibiotic prophylaxis has not been shown to be necessary or effective in preventing postextraction wound infections,45 prophylaxis with amoxicillin, 500 mg 3 times daily for 7 days after surgery, had been prescribed. On the fourth postsurgical day, the patient was bleeding. The INR was then 9.03. Warfarin (Coumadin) was withheld, and the patient underwent transfusion of fresh-frozen plasma, then packed red blood cells, and ultimately vitamin K. The authors concluded that the elevated PT was from an interaction with amoxicillin, and that the amoxicillin was probably unnecessary.

Ramstrom et al31 and Sindet-Pedersen et al34 conducted separate studies comparing results of dental surgery on patients taking anticoagulants who rinsed 4 times a day for 7 days with a tranexamic acid mouthwash with those of patients who rinsed with a placebo mouthwash. Only 1 patient in each study (each in the placebo group) developed postoperative bleeding that was treated by more than local measures. Unfortunately, the authors did not report these patients' INRs, although they reported an INR range of all patients, the upper level of which in the study by Sindet-Pedersen was above recommended therapeutic levels. More important, the study design was poor: patients should not rinse at all after dental extractions until a hemostatic clot has formed.28,46 Rinsing with a placebo mouthwash after dental extractions could have created the bleeding problem by interrupting the formation of a hemostatic clot. A more fair comparison would have been comparing tranexamic acid with no mouthwash at all.

Kwapis28 reported in 1963 that 3 of 60 treated patients had "prolonged bleeding" after dental extractions. The PT ratio was reported for only 2 of these patients, and it was less than 1.5. These patients were administered vitamin K, but it was not reported if local measures to control hemostasis were attempted before administering vitamin K.

Although there is a theoretical risk of hemorrhage after dental surgery, the literature indicates that the risk is very small. Some investigators recommend consideration of replacement heparin for especially high-risk patients undergoing extensive dental surgery. In addition to the high cost-benefit ratio for intravenous administration of heparin,47 the cases documented above include many extensive surgical procedures and argue against any withdrawal of anticoagulant therapy, including heparin replacement. In reviewing the English-language literature, there are no well-documented cases of serious bleeding problems from dental surgery in patients receiving therapeutic levels of continuous anticoagulant therapy.

DENTAL TREATMENT IN PATIENTS DURING WITHDRAWAL OF CONTINUOUS ANTICOAGULATION

Many practitioners believe that there is minimal risk of thromboembolism in patients whose anticoagulant therapy is interrupted for surgery.48 Warfarin withdrawal may49 or may not50 create a transient hypercoagulable state, but if warfarin prevents thromboembolism, then withdrawal of warfarin does not prevent thromboembolism. There have been several documented cases of serious embolic complications, including deaths, after withdrawing continuous warfarin therapy. Cosgriff51 reported that embolisms occurred in 14 of 17 patients (71% of cases) whose warfarin therapy was withdrawn. Three of these embolisms occurred within 5 days of the interruption of therapy.

In 542 documented cases in 493 patients of withdrawing continuous anticoagulation specifically for dental procedures, 5 (1.0% of patients; 0.9% of cases) had serious embolic complications (including 4 deaths). Table 2 presents the reported cases of withdrawal of continuous oral anticoagulation for dental procedures (patients receiving heparin replacement are not included).

Unfortunately, there are several documented cases of serious embolic complications in patients whose warfarin therapy has been withdrawn for dental treatment.

There are limitations in comparing the results of dental surgery in patients receiving continuous anticoagulant therapy with those of patients whose anticoagulation treatment is withdrawn. There was not necessarily a direct cause-and-effect relationship between the embolic complications and the withdrawal of warfarin therapy for dental treatment since these complications sometimes occur even if the patient continues warfarin therapy. On the other hand, some of the bleeding complications in patients who continued warfarin therapy for dental surgery may have also been coincidental since patients who have normal coagulation sometimes have postoperative bleeding.

Several studies have confirmed that warfarin therapy should not be interrupted for nonsurgical dental procedures.5,11,57,61 On the other hand, a single dental extraction has been called "a significant stress to the hemostatic mechanisms."62 Some recommend that anticoagulation therapy be reduced or withdrawn until PT or INR is near normal (PT within 1.5 times control)63,64 or even normal65 before dental surgery.

At a minimum, the application of pressure is required immediately after dental extractions, especially in patients receiving anticoagulant therapy. But dental extractions are different from other types of surgery: major vessels are unlikely to be encountered, and postoperative bleeding is usually controlled within minutes by application of pressure (biting on gauze) or, if necessary, additional local measures such as biting on tea bags (which contain tannic acid) or using gelatin sponges, topical thrombin, additional sutures, and even electrocautery. The American Dental Association has stated that for dental treatment, postoperative bleeding is minimal if the PT is close to (or even slightly above, depending on the international sensitivity index) the therapeutic range (PT up to 2 times the control).66 Several investigators have stated that postoperative bleeding after dental extractions is minimal at or above present therapeutic PT ratios (PT up to 2.5 times the control).5,67,68

Since dental extractions have been called a "significant" or even "severe" challenge to hemostasis, some assume that dental extractions in anticoagulant-treated patients present more bleeding problems than in patients not taking anticoagulants. But even patients with normal coagulation undergoing dental surgery may have postoperative hemorrhage. Several studies have compared postoperative bleeding in anticoagulant-treated patients with that of normally coagulated patients. McIntyre30 compared postoperative bleeding after dental extractions in 106 anticoagulant-treated patients with that of 106 normally coagulated patients and found no difference in postoperative bleeding. Greenberg et al26 compared blood loss after dental extractions in 13 patients receiving continuous warfarin anticoagulation with that of 7 control patients. Only 2 anticoagulant-treated patients had significantly greater blood loss per tooth than the control group (in both cases the bleeding was controlled by local measures). Bailey and Fordyce20 compared the result of extractions in 25 anticoagulant-treated patients with that of 25 control patients and found no difference in immediate postoperative bleeding. There was more "late bleeding" in the anticoagulated group, which was "easily controlled" by local measures.

Even if practicing physicians and dentists are convinced that there are sound scientific and medical reasons to continue therapeutic levels of warfarin for dental surgery, they may decide to interrupt therapy for fear of a lawsuit after complications from postoperative hemorrhage in a patient whose INR was not lowered to below the therapeutic range before dental surgery. These practitioners are actually treating the doctor rather than the patient. The leading cause of lawsuits against physicians is improper prescribing of medications,69 which may include altering therapeutic levels of anticoagulants. Although theoretically possible, there are no well-documented cases of serious postoperative bleeding complications after dental surgery in patients receiving anticoagulant therapy within the therapeutic range. If a patient whose preoperative PT ratio or INR was within the therapeutic range were to be hospitalized or even die of postoperative hemorrhage after dental surgery, the defendant can show that many authorities state that there is minimal risk of such hemorrhage during dental procedures within the therapeutic range, while pointing out the risks of thromboembolism if therapy is interrupted. On the other hand, if a patient whose warfarin dosage was reduced or withdrawn below therapeutic levels has serious complications or dies of an embolism, the plaintiff can use these same studies to reject the interruption of therapy. In either case, there are good legal reasons to continue warfarin therapy for dental surgery.

CONCLUSIONS

It is time to stop interrupting warfarin therapy for dental surgery. Although there is a theoretical risk of hemorrhage after dental surgery in patients at therapeutic levels of anticoagulation, the risk is minimal, bleeding is usually easily treated with local measures, and the risk may be greatly outweighed by the risk and morbidity of thromboembolism after withdrawal of anticoagulant therapy. There are no well-documented cases of serious bleeding problems from dental surgery in patients receiving therapeutic levels of continuous warfarin therapy. There are several documented cases of serious embolic complications, including deaths, in patients whose warfarin therapy has been withdrawn for dental treatment. Many authorities state that dental extractions can be performed with minimal risk at or above therapeutic levels of anticoagulation. Patients receiving anticoagulant therapy who undergo dental surgery have not been shown to have more bleeding problems than patients with normal coagulation. There are sound legal reasons to continue therapeutic levels of warfarin for dental treatment. Dentists and physicians should collaborate closely in treating their patients who are taking anticoagulants, especially to make sure that the patient's INR is within the therapeutic range before dental surgery. Good surgical technique and local measures to control bleeding are important in all dental surgical patients, especially those receiving continuous anticoagulation.

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Article Information

Accepted for publication January 15, 1998.

Reprints: Michael J. Wahl, DDS, 1601 Concord Pike, Wilmington, DE 19803.

References
1.
Herman  WWKonzelman  JLSutley  SH Current perspectives on dental patients receiving coumarin anticoagulant therapy. J Am Dent Assoc. 1997;128327- 335Article
2.
Bierne  ORKoehler  JR Surgical management of patients on warfarin sodium. J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 1996;541115- 1118Article
3.
Weibert  RT Oral anticoagulant therapy in patients undergoing dental surgery. Clin Pharm. 1992;11857- 864
4.
Butchart  EG Anticoagulation management during non-cardiac surgery: time for common sense. J Heart Valve Dis. 1994;3313- 314
5.
Benoliel  RLeviner  EKatz  JTzukert  A Dental treatment for the patient on anticoagulant therapy: prothrombin time value—what difference does it make? Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol. 1986;62149- 151Article
6.
Askey  JMCherry  CB Dental extraction during dicumarol therapy. Calif Med. 1956;8416- 17
7.
Pavek  VBigl  P Stomatological treatment of patients with artificial heart valves: coagulation control and antibiotic cover. Int Dent J. 1993;4359- 61
8.
Patton  LLShip  JA Treatment of patients with bleeding disorders. Dent Clin North Am. 1994;38465- 482
9.
Carr  MMMason  RB Dental management of anticoagulated patients. Can Dent Assoc J. 1992;58838- 844
10.
Roser  SMRosenbloom  B Continued anticoagulation in oral surgery procedures. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol. 1975;40448- 457Article
11.
Mulligan  RWeitzel  KG Pretreatment management of the patient receiving anticoagulant drugs. J Am Dent Assoc. 1988;117479- 483
12.
Wahl  MJHowell  J Altering anticoagulation therapy: a survey of physicians. J Am Dent Assoc. 1996;127625- 638Article
13.
Hirsh  JDalen  JEDeykin  DPoller  L Oral anticoagulants: mechanism of action, clinical effectiveness, and optimal therapeutic range. Chest. 1992;102(suppl)312S- 326SArticle
14.
Hirsh  JFuster  V Guide to anticoagulant therapy, part 2: oral anticoagulants. Circulation. 1994;891469- 1480Article
15.
Cannegieter  SCRosendaal  FRWintzen  AR  et al.  Optimal oral anticoagulant therapy in patients with mechanical heart valves. N Engl J Med. 1995;33311- 17Article
16.
Le  DTWeibert  RTSevilla  BKDonnelly  KJRapaport  SI The international normalized ratio (INR) for monitoring warfarin therapy: reliability and relation to other monitoring methods. Ann Intern Med. 1994;120552- 558Article
17.
Hirsh  JDeykin  DPoller  L "Therapeutic range" for oral anticoagulant therapy. Chest. 1986;89(suppl)11S- 15SArticle
18.
Hirsch  JPoller  L The international normalized ratio: a guide to understanding and correcting its problems. Arch Intern Med. 1994;154282- 288Article
19.
Anavi  YSharon  AGutman  DLaufer  D Dental extractions during anticoagulant therapy. Isr J Dent Med. 1981;28 ((4)) 9- 12
20.
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