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Archives CME
April 26, 1999

Archives of Internal Medicine Reader's Choice: Continuing Medical Education

Author Affiliations

Copyright 1999 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.1999

Arch Intern Med. 1999;159(8):886. doi:10.1001/archinte.159.8.886
Physicians in the United States, Canada, and Mexico

Physicians with current and valid licenses in the United States, Canada, or Mexico who read any 3 of the selected continuing medical education (CME) articles in this issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, complete the CME Evaluation Form, and fax it to the number or mail it to the address at the bottom of the CME Evaluation Form are eligible for Category 1 CME credit. There is no charge.

The American Medical Association (AMA) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to sponsor continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this educational activity for up to 1 hour of Category 1 credit per Archives of Internal Medicine issue toward the AMA Physician's Recognition Award (PRA). Each physician should claim only those hours of credit that were actually spent in the educational activity.

Physicians in Other Countries

Physicians with current and valid licenses in the United States, Mexico, or Canada are eligible for CME credit even if they live or practice in other countries. Physicians licensed in other countries are also welcome to participate in this CME activity. However, the PRA is only available to physicians licensed in the United States, Canada, or Mexico.

Earning Credit

To earn credit, read the articles designated for CME credit carefully and complete the CME Evaluation Form. The CME Evaluation Form must be submitted within 4 weeks of the issue date. A certificate awarding 1 hour of Category 1 CME credit will be faxed or mailed to you; it is then your responsibility to maintain a record of credit received.

CME Evaluation

One of our goals is to assess continually the educational needs of our readers so we may enhance the educational effectiveness of the Archives of Internal Medicine. To achieve this goal, we need your help. You must complete the CME Evaluation Form to receive credit.

Statement of Educational Purpose

For a complete description of the ARCHIVES' mission statement, please refer to the table of contents.

A flexible curriculum of article topics is developed annually by the journal's editorial board and is then supplemented throughout the year with information gained from readers, authors, reviewers, and editors. The Reader's Choice CME activity allows readers, as adult learners, to determine their own educational needs and to assist the editors in addressing their needs in future issues.

Readers of the Archives of Internal Medicine should be able to attain the following educational objectives: (1) select and read at least 3 articles per issue to gain new medical information on topics of particular interest to them as physicians, (2) assess its value to them as practicing physicians, and (3) think carefully about how this new information may influence their own practices.

CME Articles in This Issue of Archives of Internal Medicine

The following articles in this issue may be read for CME credit:

Fibromyalgia Syndrome a Decade Later: What Have We Learned?Article

Educational objective: To become familiar with the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of fibromyalgia.

Diagnosis, Management, and Treatment of Alzheimer DiseaseArticle

Educational objective: To become familiar with the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of Alzheimer disease.

Preventing Catheter-Related BacteriuriaArticle

Educational objective: To understand risk factors for catheter-induced urinary tract infection and means of reducing the risk.

Burden of Migraine in the United States: Disability and Economic CostsArticle

Educational objective: To understand the costs of migraine.

Bacterial Contamination of the Hands of Hospital Staff During Routine Patient CareArticle

Educational objective: To understand the risk factors of bacterial contamination of the hands of health care workers.

Optimism and Rehospitalization After Coronary Artery Bypass Graft SurgeryArticle

Educational objective: To understand that optimism predicts a lower rate of rehospitalization following coronary artery bypass surgery.

Impairment of Health and Quality of Life Using New US Federal Guidelines for the Identification of ObesityArticle

Educational objective: To understand the effects of obesity on a wide variety of health problems and medical outcomes.

In-hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Prearrest Morbidity and OutcomeArticle

Educational objective: To understand risk factors for survival of cardiac arrest while hospitalized.

Outcome of Diabetic Foot Infections Treated ConservativelyArticle

Educational objective: To understand factors that predict poor vs good outcome of conservative treatment of the diabetic foot.

Changes in Resource Use and Outcomes for Patients With Migraine Treated With Sumatriptan: A Managed Care PerspectiveArticle

Educational objective: To understand that use of "triptan" migraine drugs can decrease medical costs and improve quality of life.

A Prospective Study of Tender Points and Fibromyalgia During and After an Acute Viral InfectionArticle

Educational Objective: To learn that tender points are common in acute infectious mononucleosis, but fibromyalgia is rare.

Murine Typhus as a Common Cause of Fever of Intermediate Duration: A 17-Year Study in the South of SpainArticle

Educational Objective: To understand murine typhus.