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Original Investigation
May 2016

Exploring the Association Between Rosacea and Parkinson DiseaseA Danish Nationwide Cohort Study

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Dermato-Allergology, Herlev and Gentofte University Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Hellerup, Denmark
  • 2Department of Cardiology, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Hellerup, Denmark
  • 3The Danish Heart Foundation, Copenhagen
  • 4The National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen
JAMA Neurol. 2016;73(5):529-534. doi:10.1001/jamaneurol.2016.0022
Abstract

Importance  The pathogenesis of rosacea is unclear, but increased matrix metalloproteinase target tissue activity appears to play an important role. Parkinson disease and other neurodegenerative disorders also display increased matrix metalloproteinase activity that contribute to neuronal loss.

Objective  To investigate the risk of incident (new-onset) Parkinson disease in patients with rosacea.

Design, Setting, and Participants  A nationwide cohort study of the Danish population was conducted using individual-level linkage of administrative registers. All Danish citizens 18 years or older from January 1, 1997, to December 31, 2011 (N = 5 472 745), were included. Data analysis was conducted from June 26 to July 27, 2015.

Main Outcomes and Measures  The main outcome was a diagnosis of Parkinson disease. Incidence rates (IRs) per 10 000 person-years were calculated, and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) adjusted for age, sex, socioeconomic status, smoking, alcohol abuse, medication, and comorbidity were estimated by Poisson regression models.

Results  A total of 5 404 692 individuals were included in the reference population; of these, 22 387 individuals (9812 [43.8%] women; mean [SD] age at diagnosis, 75.9 [10.2] years) received a diagnosis of Parkinson disease during the study period and 68 053 individuals (45 712 [67.2%] women; mean age, 42.2 [16.5] years) were registered as having rosacea. The IRs of Parkinson disease per 10 000 person-years were 3.54 (95% CI, 3.49-3.59) in the reference population and 7.62 (95% CI, 6.78-8.57) in patients with rosacea. The adjusted IRR of Parkinson disease was 1.71 (95%, CI 1.52-1.92) in patients with rosacea compared with the reference population. There was a 2-fold increased risk of Parkinson disease in patients classified as having ocular rosacea (adjusted IRR, 2.03 [95% CI, 1.67-2.48]), and tetracycline therapy appeared to reduce the risk of Parkinson disease (adjusted IRR, 0.98 [95% CI, 0.97-0.99]).

Conclusions and Relevance  Rosacea constitutes an independent risk factor for Parkinson disease. This association could be due to shared pathogenic mechanisms involving elevated matrix metalloproteinase activity. The clinical consequences of this association require further study.

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