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Article
July 1963

A Stereotaxic Atlas of the Brain of the Squirrel Monkey.

Arch Neurol. 1963;9(1):104. doi:10.1001/archneur.1963.00460070114017

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Abstract

This atlas represents a detailed study of the brain of the squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciuerus), the most common primate of the New World. The squirrel monkey, which does not resemble the squirrel except in size, is found in Central America and South America as far south as Northern Argentina. Within recent years the squirrel monkey has served as the subject of many neurophysiological studies, especially at the University of Wisconsin. The relatively small cost of these animals and their availability indicate that they will be more widely used in basic neurological investigations in the future.

The atlas consists of two parts: (1) photographs of craniocerebral relationships and (2) photomicrographs of coronal brain sections calibrated in stereotaxic coordinates. Part I includes calibrated photographs of the skull in frontal, lateral, dorsal and basal views. This is followed by calibrated photographs of the brain: (1) in situ, and (2) following removal from the

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