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Article
November 1989

Computed Tomography, Electroencephalography, and Clinical Features in the Differential Diagnosis of Senile DementiaA Prospective Clinicopathologic Study

Author Affiliations

From the Neurological Clinic (Drs Ettlin and Kischka), and the Geriatric Clinic (Drs Staehelin and Seiler), and the Neuropathology Division, Department of Pathology (Dr Ulrich), and the Division of Electrophysiology, Neurological Clinic (Dr Scollo-Lavizzari), and the Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology (Dr Wiggli), University of Basel (Switzerland).

Arch Neurol. 1989;46(11):1217-1220. doi:10.1001/archneur.1989.00520470081031
Abstract

• The accuracy of computed tomography, electroencephalography, and clinical features in the differential diagnosis of senile dementia was studied prospectively. Out of 50 demented patients, autopsy revealed 32 cases with either senile dementia of the Alzheimer's type (SDAT), multi-infarct dementia (MID), or a combination of both. Eighteen patients had dementia caused by other diseases. Based on a combination of computed tomography, electroencephalography, and clinical features, senile dementia of the Alzheimer's type was differentiated from all 50 patients, with a specificity of 83% and a sensitivity of 80%. Focusing on senile dementia of the Alzheimer's type, multi-infarct dementia, or a combination of both, specificity decreased to 65% and sensitivity to 47%. Comparing the different methods, multi-infarct processes were diagnosed with a higher sensitivity by the clinical features (73%) than by computed tomography (18%) or electroencephalography (18%). None of the methods validly differentiated multi-infarct dementia from a combination of multi-infarct dementia and senile dementia of the Alzheimer's type.

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