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Article
October 1990

Failure of Surgery to Improve Outcome in Hypertensive Putaminal HemorrhageA Prospective Randomized Trial

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Neurological Surgery (Drs Batjer and Su and Mss Allen and Plaizier) and the Academic Computing Services (Dr Reisch), University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas.

Arch Neurol. 1990;47(10):1103-1106. doi:10.1001/archneur.1990.00530100071015
Abstract

• Hypertensive putaminal hemorrhage remains a major cause of hemorrhagic stroke carrying extremely high morbidity. Considerable controversy remains regarding the optimal form of therapy. Between 1983 and 1989 we conducted a prospective randomized trial with three treatment strategies: best medical management, best medical management plus intracranial pressure monitoring, and surgical evacuation. Only patients with significant deficit harboring a putaminal hematoma at least 3.0cm in diameter were entered. The study was interrupted after 21 patients had been studied (9, best medical management; 4, intracranial pressure monitoring; and 8, surgical evacuation). No differences were found among groups for age, admission blood pressure, and time interval between onset of symptoms and arrival at hospital. None of the subjects were capable of returning to prestroke activity. Fifteen (71%) died or remained vegetative at 6 months, and only 4 (19%) were capable of independent life at home. Of the 9 patients in the best medical management arm, 7 were dead or vegetative. In the surgical group, 4 patients died and only 2 were capable of independent life. These results suggest that current medical and neurosurgical therapies remain ineffective in preventing the devastating neurologic consequences of hypertensive putaminal hemorrhage.

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