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Article
December 1995

Morphologic Cerebral Asymmetries and Handedness-Reply

Author Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry and Neurology Tulane University School of Medicine 1430 Tulane Ave New Orleans, LA 70112-3618
Gainesville, Fla

Arch Neurol. 1995;52(12):1138. doi:10.1001/archneur.1995.00540360015004
Abstract

In reply  We appreciate Goldblatt's astute observation regarding the summary of Levy and Reid's1 findings. Furthermore, we hope to bring Goldblatt back from Matthew Arnold's darkling plain to the planum temporale and pars triangularis. Surely, Goldblatt has not joined the armies of the ignorant, as he noted an error in the text not corrected by the authors. This sentence as written adds to the confusion of the already complex relationship of writing posture to lateralized language functions.The sentence as cited2 should state: They found that right-handed subjects with a noninverted writing posture and left-handed subjects with an inverted writing posture had a right visual field advantage (left hemisphere dominance) on a verbal task, whereas right-handed subjects with an inverted writing posture and left-handed subjects with a noninverted writing posture had a left visual field advantage (right hemisphere dominance).Simply stated, the inference from these data is that

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