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Article
July 1997

The Impact of Neurologic Disease on Hospitalizations Related to Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Maryland, 1991-1992

Author Affiliations

From the Departments of Neurology (Dr Dal Pan and Mr Skolasky), Epidemiology (Dr Moore), and Medicine (Dr Moore), The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md.

Arch Neurol. 1997;54(7):846-852. doi:10.1001/archneur.1997.00550190036012
Abstract

Objectives:  To determine the impact of neurologic disease on length of stay and total hospital charges for hospitalizations related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection.

Design:  Review of all HIV-related hospitalizations from all acute nonfederal hospitals in Maryland in 1991 and 1992. Neurologic status and HIV disease status were determined by codes from the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, in an administrative database. Total hospital charges and length of stay were also included in this database.

Results:  Of 12 128 HIV-related hospitalizations (6013 patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome [AIDS], 308 HIV-seropositive patients with symptoms without AIDS, and 5807 HIV-seropositive patients without symptoms), neurologic disease occurred in 1013 (8.4%), predominantly in patients with AIDS. In all HIV-seropositive patients, those with primary neurologic disease had a longer mean (±SD) length of stay (16.4±16.5 days vs 9.3±11.3 days; P<.001) and higher mean (±SD) total charges ($12 733±$12009 vs $8069±$11 247; P<.001) than those without neurologic disease. In patients with AIDS, those with primary neurologic disease also had a longer mean (±SD) length of stay (17.2±17.2 days vs 11.7±12.7 days; P<.001) and higher mean (±SD) total charges ($13 430±$12 470 vs $10 794±$13 537; P<.001) than those without neurologic disease. After adjustment for age, sex, race, and stage of HIV infection in all HIV-seropositive patients, our results indicated that neurologic disease increased the length of stay by 3.3 days (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.9-3.8) and total charges by $2552 (95% CI, $2111-$2993). After adjustment for age, sex, and race in discharged patients with AIDS, the results showed that neurologic disease increased length of stay by 2.24 days (95% CI, 0.73-3.77) and total charges by $1512 (95% CI, $40-$2894).

Conclusion:  Neurologic disease increases the length of stay and total hospital charges of HIV-infected patients.

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