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Controversies in Neurology
January 1998

Do Nonconvulsive Seizures Damage the Brain?—Yes

Author Affiliations

From the University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Dr Young), and Jordan Neuroscience, San Bernardino, Calif (Dr Jordan).

 

HACHINSKIVLADIMIRMD, FRCPC, DSCMED

Arch Neurol. 1998;55(1):117-119. doi:10.1001/archneur.55.1.117

NONCONVULSIVE seizures (NCSs) are heterogeneous and include absence, complex partial, and simple partial seizures without convulsive activity.1 Although typical absence seizures do not damage the brain, other nonconvulsive seizures, usually complex partial status epilepticus (CPSE), can cause enduring cerebral dysfunction, affecting memory and other functions. Epileptic brain damage has been documented in humans and animals and includes cognitive impairment, recurring seizures, and neuronal death.2,3

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