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Special Millennium Article
January 2000

Will Neurological Practice Be Different During the 21st Century?

Author Affiliations

From the Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Fédération de Neurologie, Hôpital de la Salpetriere, Paris, France.

Arch Neurol. 2000;57(1):56-57. doi:10.1001/archneur.57.1.56

At the end of the 20th century, neurology is more than ever considered the most noble branch of medicine because it is concerned with mental function. Also, it is the most attractive field because of recent advancements in the neurosciences. It is the discipline of choice for the best students. During the past decade, neurologists' understanding of and their ability to diagnose neurological diseases has greatly improved because of advances in (1) neuroimaging, which make it possible to localize discrete lesions in the nervous system and to detect neuronal dysfunction even in the absence of cell loss; (2) molecular biology, which allow an approach to the causes and pathogenetic mechanisms of monogenic and polygenic hereditary disorders; and (3) brain physiology, which elucidates the anatomical-functional bases of several disorders. Will therapeutics be the forte of the 21st century?

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