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Commentary in Neurology
June 2011

Stroke and Alzheimer DiseaseFellow Travelers or Partners in Crime?

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliation: Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.

Arch Neurol. 2011;68(6):797-798. doi:10.1001/archneurol.2011.118

One in 3 of us will have a stroke, dementia, or both, unless we improve prevention. Although cerebrovascular disorders and Alzheimer disease tend to occur together, they are studied apart and late in their evolutions, when less or little can be done.

The commonest forms of stroke are silent, and Alzheimer disease begins decades before any symptoms appear.1 Moreover, epidemiological studies show that strokes and Alzheimer disease occur together and pose risks for each other (Figure), and clinical, pathological, and experimental studies3 suggest that they may also interact.

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