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May 2013

Reducing the Risk of Endophthalmitis After Intravitreous Injection

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Vanderbilt Eye Institute, Vanderbilt University Medical Center (Drs Kim, Chomsky, and Sternberg), and Ophthalmology Unit, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center (Dr Chomsky), Nashville, Tennessee.

JAMA Ophthalmol. 2013;131(5):674-675. doi:10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2013.2914

Intravitreous (IVT) injection is the fastest growing procedure in ophthalmology. The number of IVT injections performed in the United States, estimated from Medicare procedure codes, increased from fewer than 3000 injections per year in 1999 to more than 1 million injections in 2008, and the number of injections will continue to increase given the aging population and the expanding indications.1

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