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Invited Commentary
July 2014

Screening, Confirming, and Treating Amblyopia Based on Binocularity

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
JAMA Ophthalmol. 2014;132(7):820-822. doi:10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2014.2455

In the current issue of JAMA Ophthalmology, Jost and colleagues1 present further validity testing of the Pediatric Vision Scanner, which assesses binocular retinal birefringence as a method for detecting abnormal binocularity associated with strabismus and/or amblyopia. The novel technology was developed 15 years ago by David Hunter, MD, PhD, and David Guyton, MD, and has recently become available as a portable unit that can be used for screening children in a medical office or in a school setting.2

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