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Ophthalmic Images
June 11, 2015

Fuchs Uveitis

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Ophthalmology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India

Copyright 2015 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.

JAMA Ophthalmol. 2015;133(6):e1576. doi:10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2015.76

A woman in her early 20s presented with painless, progressive decrease of vision in her left eye over 2 years. On examination, best-corrected visual acuity was 20/20 OD and 20/100 OS and intraocular pressure was 16 mm Hg OU. The left iris had a moth-eaten appearance, which was in contrast to the normal iris pattern in the right eye. Slitlamp examination and optical coherence tomography of the cornea further revealed deposition of stellate keratic precipitates on the endothelial surface (Figure). Dilated examination showed a posterior subcapsular cataract along with vitreous cells. The patient was diagnosed as having Fuchs uveitis.

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