Clinical Trials
April 2007

Comparison of Initial Intraocular Pressure Response With Topical β-Adrenergic Antagonists and Prostaglandin Analogues in African American and White Individuals in the Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Devers Eye Institute/Discoveries in Sight, Legacy Health System, Portland, Ore (Drs Mansberger and Cioffi); Kresge Eye Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Mich (Dr Hughes); Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Mo (Drs Gordon, Spaner, and Kass and Ms Beiser). Group Information: A complete list of the members of the OHTS Group appears on the OHTS Web site:




Copyright 2007 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.2007

Arch Ophthalmol. 2007;125(4):454-459. doi:10.1001/archopht.125.4.454

Objective  To compare the intraocular pressure (IOP) responses of self-identified African American and white participants in the Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study to therapeutic trials of topical, nonselective β-adrenergic antagonists or prostaglandin analogues.

Methods  Multivariate models that adjusted for baseline IOP and corneal thickness were used to estimate IOP response by race. Participants included 536 who were prescribed topical β-adrenergic antagonists and 191 who were prescribed prostaglandin analogues, 25% of whom were African American.

Main Outcome Measure  Intraocular pressure response in the ipsilateral eye after 4 to 6 weeks of a therapeutic trial.

Results  Intraocular pressure response to nonselective β-adrenergic antagonists did not differ between African American and white participants. Intraocular pressure response to prostaglandin analogues was slightly greater in African American participants, but this difference was not statistically significant. With both classes of medication, greater IOP reduction was associated with higher baseline IOP and thinner central corneal measurement.

Conclusions  We found no statistically significant differences in IOP response to topical, nonselective β-adrenergic antagonists or prostaglandin analogues between self-identified African American and white individuals.

Application to Clinical Practice  Studies of IOP response to medication should statistically adjust for baseline IOP and central corneal thickness. Clinicians should consider factors other than ethnicity when choosing an ocular hypotensive medication for a patient.

Trial Registration Identifier: ""