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From the Archives of the Archives
June 8, 2009

140 Years Ago . . .

Arch Ophthalmol. 2009;127(6):731. doi:10.1001/archophthalmol.2009.99

About fifteen years ago the genius of Prof. Virchow predicted that, with the ophthalmoscope, embolism in the retinal artery might be directly seen in the living body. This suggestion was a fruit of his brilliant discoveries of the varied series of morbid changes, resulting from the obstruction of blood vessels by thrombosis and embolism. Four years later, Prof. V. Graefe observed the first case in which almost instantaneous blindness was caused by obstruction of the central retinal artery, in a patient suffering from indocarditis [sic].

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