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Article
January 1929

HISTOLOGIC OBSERVATIONS IN A CASE OF LOCALIZED TUBERCULOUS CHORIORETINITIS

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1929;1(1):63-70. doi:10.1001/archopht.1929.00810010066003
Abstract

The most frequent type of choroiditis, at least in my experience, is that which, for convenience, I shall designate localized chorioretinitis. In the textbooks, this condition is inadequately described. In a typical early case, there is seen in the fundus a rounded or oval, almost white, slightly elevated area with ill defined margins, which may be about the size of the optic disk or several times larger. Within this area, the retinal vessels may be partly or wholly obscured, while the vessels approaching it may show white mantles and apparently constricted lumina. Occasionally, small hemorrhagic extravasations are seen within or adjacent to the area. In this vicinity, a number of small white spots may be observed, and rarely there is a smaller area nearby, similar to the larger one. The vitreous is filled with fine opacities. Later, there may be moderate ciliary congestion, descemetitis and, in severe cases, posterior synechia.

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