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Article
July 1930

OBSCURE SYMPATHETIC PHENOMENAREPORT OF TWO CASES

Author Affiliations

DURBAN, SOUTH AFRICA

Arch Ophthalmol. 1930;4(1):90-92. doi:10.1001/archopht.1930.00810090098008
Abstract

Notwithstanding the great amount of attention that has been directed of late years to the subject of sympathetic ophthalmia and sympathetic phenomena generally, ophthalmologists are still far from arriving at a thorough understanding of the causes that induce these conditions. It is only by collecting facts that the desired explanation can ultimately be found. Therefore, I think that it is the duty of ophthalmologists to record any cases presenting peculiar or unusual features. That is why I venture to publish my notes on the cases of two patients who have recently come under my care.

Many years ago, Dr. Mules of London introduced the practice of eviscerating the eyeball, in lieu of extirpation, and afterward inserting in the place of its contents a hollow glass ball, which was kept in position by sutures through the cut edges of the conjunctiva.

As several cases of sympathetic ophthalmia were reported as the

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