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Article
May 1932

MYASTHENIA GRAVISNEW DIAGNOSTIC EYE FINDINGS, WITH POSSIBLE PATHOLOGIC SIGNIFICANCE

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES

Arch Ophthalmol. 1932;7(5):700-719. doi:10.1001/archopht.1932.00820120050003
Abstract

Myasthenia gravis was first described by Wilkes in 1877. Since then about 300 cases have been reported and several excellent reviews have appeared (Buzzard,1 Campbell and Bramwell,2 Keschner and Strauss,3 Jaensch,4 Marinesco, Sager and Kreindler5 and others). It is intended here to recapitulate briefly the more important observations and theories, to discuss some new eye findings in the light of these theories and to consider these new findings as possible diagnostic aids.

The condition can probably be most briefly defined as a symptom complex characterized by sudden, intermittent and progressive clinical weakness of a muscle or muscle group, often terminating in death and leaving almost no pathologic changes despite the marked symptoms during life. No race is immune to this condition. According to Campbell and Bramwell, no case is on record in which more than one member of a family has been affected. Noyes,

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