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Article
January 1933

MORGAGNIAN CATARACTS AND THEIR COMPLICATIONSWITH REPORT OF A CASE OF SPONTANEOUS RUPTURE OF THE LENS CAPSULE CAUSING SECONDARY GLAUCOMA

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Ophthalmology of the Michael Reese and Research and Educational Hospitals.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1933;9(1):56-63. doi:10.1001/archopht.1933.00830010063006
Abstract

A survey of the literature on this subject impresses one with the steadily decreasing frequency of so-called morgagnian cataract, so much so that this type of cataract, which was once such a frequent occurrence, bids fair to become something short of an ophthalmologic curiosity. In 1912 Chance1 called attention to the fact that, since 1890, no case had been presented before the Section of Ophthalmology of the American Medical Association, nor had he found any report in the Transactions of the American Ophthalmological Society. Taylor,2 in reporting a case before the Ophthalmological Society of the United Kingdom, stated that for thirty years not a single instance had been brought before that society. It is possible that typical morgagnian cataract, consisting of a capsular sac containing a more or less transparent free floating nucleus in the midst of a completely liquefied cortex, is not as rare as the scanty

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