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Article
June 1933

RETROBULBAR NEURITIS AND DISEASE OF THE NASAL ACCESSORY SINUSES

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Section on Ophthalmology, the Mayo Clinic.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1933;9(6):893-906. doi:10.1001/archopht.1933.00830010917001
Abstract

The function of the optic nerves and optic tracts is to convey the various impulses of light stimuli from the retinas to the cortex of the brain and to carry them uninterruptedly with regard to strength, quality and duration of the stimulus. The structure of the optic nerve is such that interruption of stimuli in isolated bundles of fibers may occur with little if any interference with the proper function of the remainder of the nerve, a condition that is projected in the visual field as scotoma or anopsia. Knowledge of the position of various bundles of fibers in the nerve, with reference to the retinal elements and their projection into the visual field, is used as a basis for determining the situation of obstructions along the visual pathways. Of particular significance are homonymous anopsia and scotoma. When only one eye is involved, or when one eye is blind, the

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