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Article
August 1934

SWELLING OF THE NERVE HEADS WITH ARACHNOIDITIS AND UNUSUAL CHANGES IN THE VISUAL FIELDS

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Peter Ophthalmological Clinic, University of Pennsylvania, Graduate School of Medicine.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1934;12(2):167-179. doi:10.1001/archopht.1934.00830150021002
Abstract

I have had under observation an interesting case of swelling of the nerve heads associated with arachnoiditis and with unusual changes in the visual fields.

REPORT OF A CASE

A man, aged 41, was referred to me for refraction a little more than twentyfour months ago. At that time he gave a history of migraine which had been present for nineteen years, the attacks averaging two a month and always being accompanied by intense pain in the head, by nausea and by prostration. The pain was so severe that repeated doses of morphine were necessary. He had acquired considerable tolerance for this drug, and large doses were necessary for relief ; he did not, however, use morphine except during the attacks. Corrected vision was 6/5 in the right eye and 6/15 in the left. The left eye showed an old paralysis of the inferior rectus muscle, for which he had

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