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Article
September 1934

EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES ON SWELLING OF THE VITREOUS GEL AND ON INTRA-OCULAR PRESSURE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Departments of Ophthalmology and Biochemistry, New York Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital (Columbia University).

Arch Ophthalmol. 1934;12(3):352-358. doi:10.1001/archopht.1934.00830160056006
Abstract

Swelling of the vitreous gel has, from time to time, been proposed as the cause of the increased pressure frequently observed in simple glaucoma. In our opinion no proof has been presented that the vitreous has any swelling capacity. All experiments in which the whole eye has been used to study the swelling of the vitreous must be looked on with doubt for the reason that the swelling of the external coats might overshadow that of the vitreous. On the other hand, in experiments in which the whole vitreous itself has been studied, no definite swelling has been demonstrated. It is important to discriminate between actual swelling against a resisting force and mere increase in volume of the gel when immersed in a liquid.

One objective in the experiments herein reported was to measure the swelling power of the whole vitreous of the ox against the force of gravity

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