[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
August 1935

A NEW BANDAGE FOR THE EYE ESPECIALLY RECOMMENDED FOR USE AFTER INTRAOCULAR OPERATION

Author Affiliations

Chicago
From the Division of Ophthalmology, the University of Chicago.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1935;14(2):263-265. doi:10.1001/archopht.1935.00840080089010

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

The various types of ocular bandages used after intra-ocular operations invariably necessitate the use of adhesive tape. Most ophthalmologists change these bandages daily. In the removal of such a bandage the end of one of the strips of adhesive tape is lifted from the patient's face, usually by means of the finger-nail, and the strip is pulled away from the skin. This is repeated two or three times, depending on the number of strips of tape that were used. This somewhat painful procedure frequently causes sudden forcible squeezing of the lids. By such an act pressure is exerted on the eyeball, and undesirable complications may be produced.

To reduce the amount of discomfort and pain during the removal of the tape, a solvent for the adhesive substance is used, and the tape is gently drawn from the skin. Even this procedure is not entirely free from

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×