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Article
September 1936

MULTIPLE GOLD FOREIGN BODIES IN THE CORNEA

Arch Ophthalmol. 1936;16(3):462-464. doi:10.1001/archopht.1936.00840210136010
Abstract

Introduction and embedding of foreign bodies in the substance of the cornea is a matter of every-day occurrence. The tolerance of the cornea to such insults depends in a great measure on the type of foreign body. Naturally, of metallic bodies, those offering the greatest resistance to oxidation are the least troublesome. The following case is reported as an illustration.

REPORT OF A CASE

The patient was brought to the New York Polyclinic Medical School and Hospital in an ambulance on March 3, 1926, with injuries to the face and eyes following an explosion.

He stated that he was an enameler of jewelry and that in the course of his occupation it was necessary to prepare a gold suspension. In doing so on the day preceding admission to the hospital he had boiled some 24 carat gold five minutes in nitrohydrochloric acid, a solution of two parts nitric acid

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