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Article
February 1937

CONGENITAL ANOMALIES OF THE ANTERIOR SEGMENT OF THE EYE

Author Affiliations

AMSTERDAM, HOLLAND

Arch Ophthalmol. 1937;17(2):223-227. doi:10.1001/archopht.1937.00850020029003
Abstract

The anterior vitreous body (mesostroma) closely connected to the posterior surface of the primitive and later of the definitive ectodermal cornea very soon loses its connection with the lens by atrophy of the cones of the lens epithelia from which it partly originated. A basal membrane toward the lens develops, as always appears if a mesostroma loses its connection with the epithelial strata (Studnicka), which becomes more marked as mesodermal cells grow into the anterior vitreous and have a share in constituting the loose postendothelial tissue (fig. 1 A). The latter tissue atrophies ; the basal membrane, the primitive membranous pupillary membrane, remains (fig. 1 B). This membrane was also described by Seefelder1 and Fischer.2 Thus this membranous pupillary membrane is differentiated in a tissue intimately connected with the posterior surface of the definitive ectodermal cornea. The anterior vitreous over the center of the lens is

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