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Article
December 1937

A CASE OF MIXED TUMOR OF THE LACRIMAL GLANDWITH RETINAL FOLDS AND CHOROIDAL DETACHMENT, WHICH DISAPPEARED AFTER REMOVAL OF THE GROWTH

Arch Ophthalmol. 1937;18(6):933-937. doi:10.1001/archopht.1937.00850120067008
Abstract

So-called mixed tumor of the lacrimal gland is relatively uncommon, and to date about 275 cases of this condition have been recorded. Though the lacrimal gland is almost identical in histologic structure with the parotid and salivary glands, it appears to be much less subject to neoplastic growths than are those glands, which are situated nearer the alimentary tract. The more protected situation of the lacrimal gland as regards trauma or toxic influences suggests itself as a reason for its greater immunity.

Warthin1 in 1901 made the first complete pathologic investigation of such a tumor. In 1905 Verhoeff2 reported in detail 1 case of his own and 4 cases collected from the records of the Massachusetts Charitable Eye and Ear Hospital. In 1922 Lane,3 of the Mayo Clinic, gave a short résumé of tumors of the lacrimal gland reported to that date, about 212 cases in

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