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Article
July 1941

PATHOLOGIC CONDITIONS OF THE CORNEAII. THE SUBSTANTIA PROPRIA

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C.
From the Registry of Ophthalmic Pathology, Army Medical Museum.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1941;26(1):108-126. doi:10.1001/archopht.1941.00870130126014
Abstract

The initial half of this work1 dealt with the epithelium, the endothelium and Bowman's and Descemet's membranes. It was pointed out that the primary characteristic of the cornea is transparency, which is dependent on the water content of the tissue, and that this is regulated by the anatomic and functional integrity of the delimiting layers. In this installment there will be viewed the behavior of the substantia propria, which forms the bulk of the corneal tissue.

ANATOMY  The substantia propria, or stroma, is composed of broad, thin lamellas arranged parallel to the surface of the cornea and lacing themselves together in an in and out manner. Each lamella is composed of fine connective tissue fibrillae arranged in a parallel direction. Elastic tissue fibers are present throughout but are especially numerous posteriorly. It is this parallelism of the structural elements that plays an important role in the transparency of the

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