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Article
July 1942

OPERATIVE RESULTS IN TWO HUNDRED AND ELEVEN CASES OF CONVERGENT STRABISMUS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Ophthalmology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and the Institute of Ophthalmology, Presbyterian Hospital.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1942;28(1):1-11. doi:10.1001/archopht.1942.00880070013001
Abstract

It is a matter of common knowledge that the operative results in strabismus are extremely variable. Some surgeons are highly pleased with their results, while others of equal skill are disappointed in the outcome. Such a difference in opinion does not necessarily mean a wide variation in the results but rather means a discrepancy in their evaluation. The surgeon who routinely expects binocular single vision with complete abolition of the deviation is faced with many disappointments, while the operator who is satisfied with an immediate cosmetic correction without thought of preservation of convergence or of adequate rotation is lulled into a false sense of security about his operations on muscles. Between these two extremes there is a middle ground into which most surgical corrections fall ; the results are not perfect, since binocular single vision is not restored, but the correction does not cripple the movements of the eye and is

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