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Article
June 1943

ADIE'S SYNDROMEREPORT OF TWO CASES

Author Affiliations

WALLA WALLA, WASH.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1943;29(6):936-941. doi:10.1001/archopht.1943.00880180086007
Abstract

The presence in healthy persons of one myotonic pupil associated with a disturbance or absence of one or more of the deep tendon reflexes is neither a recent discovery nor a rare condition. As long ago as 1902, Saenger1 and Strasburger2 independently published descriptions of this symptom complex, and in 1906 Markus3 reported a case in which it occurred in a boy 12 years of age; but it was more than twenty-five years later before the disorder, now called by the name Adie's syndrome, was generally accorded the serious attention either of ophthalmologists or of neurologists. Even today the pathogenesis4 of this condition is not understood and unanimity as to its clinical importance is lacking. Errors in diagnosis are not unusual. The most frequent mistake has been to regard the myotonic pupil, with its concomitant symptoms, as a manifestation of syphilis of the central nervous system,

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