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Article
September 1943

RUPTURE OF ANEURYSM OF CIRCLE OF WILLISRELATIONSHIP BETWEEN INTRAOCULAR AND INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGE

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1943;30(3):312-319. doi:10.1001/archopht.1943.00880210036003
Abstract

The earliest account of intraocular hemorrhage associated with intracranial hemorrhage which had extended into the intervaginal spaces of the optic nerve was the observation of Hale-White1 in 1895. He stated the belief that "the hemorrhage had passed forward in the sheath of the optic nerves which were much distended with blood clot and ultimately tore its way forward under the retina."

Uhthoff2 was one of the first to question the validity of this belief. Other investigators (Dupuy-Dutemps,3 Riddoch and Goulden4 and Macdonald5) have shown by histopathologic examination that there was no evidence of blood having traveled from either the subdural or the subarachnoid space around the nerve forward into the eye. Since the publication of their reports, there has been considerable controversy over the relationship between intraocular hemorrhage and intracranial hemorrhage.

According to Fearnsides,6 the first definite account of an intracranial aneurysm was published

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