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Article
June 1944

DEVELOPMENT OF ANTERIOR PERIPHERAL SYNECHIAE IN EXPERIMENTAL ACUTE GLAUCOMA

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Ophthalmology, Columbia University, and the Ophthalmological Institute of the Presbyterian Hospital.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1944;31(6):481-502. doi:10.1001/archopht.1944.00890060051004
Abstract

To the memory of my friend, the distinguished ophthalmologist, Dr. John Martin Wheeler  .It has long been debated whether the cause of hypertension associated with acute or subacute congestive glaucoma is exclusively a mechanical one, produced by the application of the root of the iris against the corneal limbus, or whether, on the contrary, the anterior peripheral synechia is the result of preexisting hypertension. Historically, the first position was substantiated by Knies and Weber,1 who in glaucomatous eyes examined with the microscope always observed an adhesion of the root of the iris to the cornea. However, several observers, including myself,2 objected that the microscopic sections were made in old glaucomatous eyes enucleated after the process had run its course. On the other hand, microscopic examination of eyes with acute or subacute glaucoma which were removed shortly after the attack, when the patient died of an intercurrent disease (Birnbacher

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