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Article
March 1945

GLAUCOMA DUE TO PERIPHERAL ANTERIOR SYNECHIAS AFTER OPERATION FOR CATARACT

Arch Ophthalmol. 1945;33(3):199-202. doi:10.1001/archopht.1945.00890150043005
Abstract

The multiple factors which influence the intraocular pressure are so closely interrelated and regulated in the normal human being that it is almost impossible to attribute a given rise in intraocular pressure to the action of any single factor. Even in the case of the best known rise occurring in the normal human eye, that during Valsalva's experiment, one is unable to decide whether the cause is an increased volume of blood in the uvea or an interference with the function of Schlemm's canal. Ocular disease occasionally singles out one of the main factors concerned with the regulation of the intraocular pressure and thus creates a glaucomatous state with a much simpler mechanism than that underlying the normal intraocular pressure. A classic example of such a glaucomatous state is the one caused by peripheral anterior synechias following prolonged absence of the anterior chamber after operation for cataract. It is reasonably certain

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