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Article
February 1946

TRAUMATIC LIPORRHAGIA RETINALISReport of a Case

Author Affiliations

Medical Corps, Army of the United States

Arch Ophthalmol. 1946;35(2):176-178. doi:10.1001/archopht.1946.00890200181011

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Abstract

TRAUMATIC liporrhagia retinals, commonly known as Purtscher's disease, or the syndrome of the posterior pole of the eyeball, is characterized by exudation and hemorrhage in the posterior pole of a nontraumatized eye, followed (in some cases) by atrophy of the optic nerve. Precipitating factors are head injury, fractures of the vertebrae and long bones and compression injuries of the chest. In the case presented the lesion was unilateral, related to both the arterioles and the venules and terminated in almost complete atrophy of the optic nerve.

The photographs of the fundus show the advanced degree of atrophy of the optic nerve and the organized exudate in the macular area (fig. A and B).

REPORT OF CASE 

History.  —A Filipino boy aged 11 was struck and knocked to the ground by an Army vehicle on June 9, 1944. He was not rendered unconscious, but he stated that his breath was "knocked

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