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Article
February 1947

SURGICAL METHODS OF TREATING PARALYSIS OF THE SUPERIOR OBLIQUE MUSCLE

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Department of Ophthalmology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1947;37(2):121-133. doi:10.1001/archopht.1947.00890220130001
Abstract

ISOLATED paralysis of the superior oblique muscle is frequently encountered. According to Bielschowsky,1 it is exceeded in occurrence only by paralysis of the external rectus muscle. Involvement of the superior rectus muscle is often encountered, but usually this is associated with paralysis of one or more of the other muscles supplied by the oculomotor nerve. While probably the most frequent, paralysis of the superior oblique is certainly the most puzzling single vertical paralysis with which the ophthalmologist has to deal. Congenital paralysis is not common, but bilateral involvement, usually thought to be congenital, is sometimes seen. The literature, however, records relatively few cases in which treatment has been carried out, and in these a great variety of surgical procedures have been offered. In fact, at some time or other almost every muscle attached to the globe has been used in one way or another. It is interesting to compare

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