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Article
February 1947

REMOVAL OF DEEPLY EMBEDDED FOREIGN BODIES FROM THE CORNEA

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Eye Center, Newton D. Baker General Hospital. Martinsburg, W. Va.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1947;37(2):189-193. doi:10.1001/archopht.1947.00890220198010

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Abstract

CORNEAL foreign bodies lying close to Descemet's membrane always present a problem. When the eye involved is the patient's only good eye, the necessity for careful surgical handling is proportionately greater. During the past year, 6 deeply embedded corneal foreign bodies requiring removal were seen at this Army ophthalmic center. These foreign bodies were all in eyes with normal vision or with vision correctable to normal. Two of the patients were monocular. A third had only perception of hand movements in the other eye. In a fourth patient the other eye was aphakic, with a corrected vision of 20/70. Two patients had good vision in both eyes.

All the patients were battle casualties, and the foreign bodies were all metallic. Three were found to be magnetic after removal. In this connection, I should like to state, however, that even if the foreign body is magnetic the magnet is useless in

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