[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 1947

USE OF FROZEN-DRIED CORNEA AS TRANSPLANT MATERIAL

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Department of Ophthalmology of the University of Pennsylvania.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1947;37(3):268-276. doi:10.1001/archopht.1947.00890220278002
Abstract

KERATOPLASTY has reached the stage today at which the demand for donor corneas has exceeded the supply. The small supply is largely due to the difficulty in preserving all available corneal tissue until the time at which it is needed. With the present methods of preservation, corneal tissue held over seventy-two hours is believed to be unsatisfactory for transplantation. Such tissue is usually kept in Ringer's solution or isotonic solution of sodium chloride or in a moist chamber at a temperature of 2 or 3 C.1 In an effort to increase the donor supply, the present experiment was undertaken. The purpose of the experiment was to determine the value of frozen-dried cornea (Weiss method)2 for corneal transplantation, as suggested by the preliminary experiments with rat cornea of Weiss and Taylor.3

METHOD  Transplants of frozen-dried rabbit cornea, prepared by Dr. Paul Weiss, were attempted on 75 normal rabbit

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×