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Article
March 1947

PATHOGENESIS OF GLAUCOMA AND "GLAUCOMATOUS" ATROPHY OF THE OPTIC NERVE

Arch Ophthalmol. 1947;37(3):324-335. doi:10.1001/archopht.1947.00890220334009
Abstract

SOME investigators, Fuchs1 for example, have called attention to certain congenital anomalies of the glaucomatous eyeball. A characteristic small bulbus, a shallow anterior chamber, bulging ciliary processes and a comparatively large lens are met with in glaucoma. The higher incidence of "inflammatory" glaucoma in hyperopic persons may point in the same direction. In hydrophthalmos the ligamentum pectinatum and the angle of the anterior chamber are originally underdeveloped. The lens is rather small. Bilateral spherophakia, with a congenitally weak zonula, may be complicated by glaucoma, as Bowman2 noted. All these anomalies mean a developmental peculiarity or disproportionate growth of the various tissues of the bulbus. According to studies which I have carried out in recent years, to be published elsewhere, proportionate physical growth is related to the normal activity and normal development of the central nervous system, including the pituitary body and the epiphysis. The eyeball, the optic nerve

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