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Article
May 1947

EFFECT OF TRAINING METHODS ON COLOR VISION

Author Affiliations

ANDOVER, MASS.; BOSTON; ANDOVER, MASS.
From the Department of Health, Phillips Academy (J. R. Gallagher and C. D. Gallagher) ; the Howe Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, and the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary (E. J. Ludvigh and S. F. Martin).

Arch Ophthalmol. 1947;37(5):572-582. doi:10.1001/archopht.1947.00890220589002
Abstract

IN VARIOUS surveys it has been found that from 6 to 8 per cent of unselected males are unable to make the proper responses to a series of color vision test plates.1 At the present time certain specialized branches of the armed services require that applicants be able to read correctly all the series of these plates ; consequently, a number sufficiently large to make color vision testing a matter of considerable significance could be rejected. In a recent publicationlb the efficiency of some of the plates used in one testing method was questioned, and the suggestion was made that only a small number (ten) of these plates need be used for the satisfactory evaluation of color vision.2 In that publication2 these ten plates are referred to as "key" plates. Regardless of the reliability of various testing methods or the desirability of altering present standards, there still

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