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Article
June 1947

TREATMENT OF CORNEAL ULCER WITH BLOOD AND BLOOD PLASMA

Arch Ophthalmol. 1947;37(6):779-781. doi:10.1001/archopht.1947.00890220803007
Abstract

IT IS notable that the cornea is avascular and derives its nourishment by dialysis from the perilimbal plexus. For this reason healing of corneal infections may become sluggish and prolonged. It is also notable that frequently lesions of the cornea clear up only after vascularization has occurred. According to Duke-Elder,1 the neovascularization is a response to a call for help by a tissue in difficulty.

In view of the lack of an adequate nutrient supply system in the cornea, it would appear logical to apply the needed nutrient elements directly to the cornea in the form of drops, made up either of whole blood or of blood plasma. Although, so far as is known, this procedure has never been reported as an adjuvant in the treatment of corneal ulcer, excellent results have been reported by other workers from its use in local treatment of ulcers of the leg.

Murray

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